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Tuesday, July 15, 2014 Friday, April 11, 2014
There’s so much hate in the world and a little bit of love won’t hurt anybody. I believe in total freedom and having a good time. Thomas Bleming, U.S. Senate candidate in Wyoming
Friday, April 4, 2014
I think the American people should know that the members of Congress are underpaid.

U.S. Rep. Jim Moran, D-Virginia

(The average member of Congress rakes in $174,000 a year.)

Thursday, April 3, 2014 Thursday, January 16, 2014 Friday, January 10, 2014 Thursday, September 5, 2013 Monday, January 14, 2013
When we worry about money in politics, we tend to worry about a system that’s akin to bribery. That happens, but it’s rarer then you might think. Typically, politicians raise money from interests they’re already relatively aligned with. Money brings the legislator and his benefactor closer into alignment, and it certainly helps concentrate a politician’s attention on issues they might otherwise have ignored, but it’s uncommon for a sack of cash to flip a vote outright.

What we don’t worry about enough is the way the hunt for money saps another precious resource: time. A few months back, I sat down with former Connecticut senator Chris Dodd, who marveled at the sums that were spent in his state’s 2010 Senate race. “I don’t know how you do it,” he said. “I would have no idea how to raise that kind of money in a campaign. And that’s new to me. I don’t know what that’s meant in terms of people’s ability then to concentrate on their jobs.”

— The most depressing graphic for members of Congress
When we worry about money in politics, we tend to worry about a system that’s akin to bribery. That happens, but it’s rarer then you might think. Typically, politicians raise money from interests they’re already relatively aligned with. Money brings the legislator and his benefactor closer into alignment, and it certainly helps concentrate a politician’s attention on issues they might otherwise have ignored, but it’s uncommon for a sack of cash to flip a vote outright. What we don’t worry about enough is the way the hunt for money saps another precious resource: time. A few months back, I sat down with former Connecticut senator Chris Dodd, who marveled at the sums that were spent in his state’s 2010 Senate race. “I don’t know how you do it,” he said. “I would have no idea how to raise that kind of money in a campaign. And that’s new to me. I don’t know what that’s meant in terms of people’s ability then to concentrate on their jobs.”
The most depressing graphic for members of Congress
Thursday, September 6, 2012
Federal emergency unemployment insurance programs are meant to be temporary and to expire once the labor market returns to reasonable health. But since policymakers first created an emergency federal unemployment insurance program in 1958, they have never allowed one to end when unemployment topped 7.2 percent. With unemployment expected to be around 8 percent at the end of this year, letting Emergency Unemployment Compensation expire abruptly would deal a cruel and unprecedented blow to people struggling to find a job. Congress Can’t Let Emergency Unemployment Expire
Monday, May 2, 2011
We are a nation of peace and laws, and people everywhere should understand that our ten-year manhunt was in search of justice not revenge. Terrorists everywhere must never doubt that the United States will hunt them down no matter where they are, no matter how long it takes. Sen. John Kerry — Congress Praises Obama, Troops After Bin Laden Death
Thursday, February 10, 2011 Thursday, January 6, 2011
GOP’s Boehner Gets House Speaker’s Gavel

Ohio Republican John Boehner has finally received his life-long wish: He is speaker of the House of Representatives. In a symbolic move, outgoing Speaker Nancy Pelosi handed over the gavel to Boehner, who gave a brief speech in which he pledged to move forward with the conservative agenda voters approved in giving the GOP control of the House.

(Illustration by Ed Wexler for USN&WR)

GOP’s Boehner Gets House Speaker’s Gavel

Ohio Republican John Boehner has finally received his life-long wish: He is speaker of the House of Representatives. In a symbolic move, outgoing Speaker Nancy Pelosi handed over the gavel to Boehner, who gave a brief speech in which he pledged to move forward with the conservative agenda voters approved in giving the GOP control of the House.

(Illustration by Ed Wexler for USN&WR)

Wednesday, December 29, 2010
Congress is one of the few workplaces where one can get away with bringing a dog (as most lawmaking pet-owners do) or a cat (not so common—the cats tend to demand their own offices) to the office without being too disruptive. And while the upkeep can be a distraction, the benefits are substantial: senators and congressmen who have their pets in the office are almost uniformly more sanguine—and thus more likely to have a civilized relationship with their colleagues—if there is a tail-wagging, non-judgmental domesticated animal waiting for them then they return from a contentious committee hearing or caucus lunch. Even staffers who don’t much enjoy taking the pup out for a quick pit-stop will attest that the positive impact the pets have on their bosses makes it all worthwhile. Advice for New Members of Congress: Bring Your Dog to Work
Tuesday, December 28, 2010
One side of the flier showed GOP luminaries like Colin Powell, Robert Gates, and George H.W. Bush, all of whom support the nuke pact, while the reverse featured Sarah Palin, a START opponent. “The individuals in the first group have over a century of foreign policy experience between them, and have worked closely on U.S.-Russia relations for decades,” the flier stated. “On the other hand, Palin can see Russia from her house. Apparently, that’s good enough for many Senate Republicans.” Reid and Democrats Lash Out at Republicans
Monday, December 27, 2010