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One of the most bizarre contests you’ll ever encounter: Babies cry while being held by college student sumo wrestlers during the Naki Sumo or “Crying Baby Contest” at Sensoji temple in Tokyo. The annual traditional ritual is performed as a prayer for healthy growth. For more photos from the contest, go here

One of the most bizarre contests you’ll ever encounter: Babies cry while being held by college student sumo wrestlers during the Naki Sumo or “Crying Baby Contest” at Sensoji temple in Tokyo. The annual traditional ritual is performed as a prayer for healthy growth. For more photos from the contest, go here

Friday, January 11, 2013

The rise of “infidelity phones” in Japan

Fujitsu’s “privacy mode” is a layer of nearly invisible security that hides missed calls, emails and text messages from contacts designated as private. If one of those acquaintances gets in touch, the only signal of that communication is a subtle change in the color or shape of how the battery sign or antenna bars are displayed. If ignored, the call doesn’t appear in the phone log. The changes are so subtle that it would be impossible to spot for an untrained eye. When the privacy mode is turned off through a secret combination of keys, the concealed calls and messages appear, and voice mail becomes accessible.
Japan’s Philanderers Stay Faithful to Their ‘Infidelity Phones’
Wednesday, December 7, 2011
Ford Island is seen in this aerial view during the Japanese attack on Pearl harbor December 7, 1941 in Hawaii. The photo was taken from a Japanese plane.

Photos: Pearl Harbor, 70 years later.

Ford Island is seen in this aerial view during the Japanese attack on Pearl harbor December 7, 1941 in Hawaii. The photo was taken from a Japanese plane.

Photos: Pearl Harbor, 70 years later.

Thursday, March 17, 2011
These pills only protect you against radioactive iodine, and we have seen only a little in the way of radioactive iodine being released. Given the fact that it has a very short half-life, it’s close to zero that any radioactive iodine of any quantity that would do any harm would end up on U.S. shores. Jacqueline Williams, program director for radiation medicine at the University of Rochester Medical Center’s Center for Biophysical Assessment and Risk Management Following Irradiation — Rush to Buy Iodine Pills Unnecessary in U.S., Experts Say

Concern Grows After Fire at Japanese Nuclear Plant: Workers at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant are working to contain the radiation

Japan faced another difficult day Wednesday, as the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant—the site of multiple explosions since last week’s 8.9-magnitude earthquake—caught on fire once again. Fifty employees are reportedly risking their lives to try to get the plant under control, but information about what exactly is going on with the plant’s nuclear reactors is scarce and sometimes contradictory.

Monday, March 14, 2011
More photos from the aftermath of the Japan earthquake and tsunami.
Friday, March 11, 2011
Photos: Earthquake and Tsunami in Japan