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Monday, December 16, 2013 Tuesday, April 2, 2013
European Job Woes Make America Look Brilliant
Thursday, October 11, 2012

Claims for unemployment benefits at lowest point since early 2008

Claims for unemployment benefits plunge 30,000

The number of Americans seeking unemployment aid plummeted to 339,000 last week, the lowest level in more than four years. The sharp drop, a shocker to analysts and investors, offered a hopeful sign that the job market could be picking up. The Labor Department says weekly applications fell by 30,000 to the lowest level since February 2008.
Simon Owens is an assistant managing editor at U.S. News & World Report. Follow him on Twitter, Facebook, or Google+. Email him at sowens@usnews.com
Wednesday, October 10, 2012
This infographic comes to us via FactCheck.org, which describes it as “an accurate statistical picture of key changes that occurred since Obama took office in January 2009.”

This infographic comes to us via FactCheck.org, which describes it as “an accurate statistical picture of key changes that occurred since Obama took office in January 2009.”

Tuesday, September 11, 2012

How to mislead with statistics to make the economy seem worse than it actually is

Today In Dishonest Fox News Graphics

During a segment criticizing the Obama administration for its messaging on the economy, a Fox & Friends graphic claimed that the “real unemployment rate” had increased from 7.8% in 2009 to 14.7% now. But in order to make the claim that unemployment had increased from 7.8% to 14.7% during Obama’s time in office, Fox had to conflate two different statistics and completely distort Obama’s jobs record. The 7.8 percent figure is the official unemployment rate from January 2009. This statistic reports on people who are unemployed and actively looking for a job. But as of the latest report, the official unemployment rate is 8.1 percent (0.3 percent higher than it was in January 2009), not 14.7 percent. The 14.7 percent figure is a completely different measurement of the unemployed, which in addition to those who are actively looking for work, also counts people who are unemployed and discouraged from looking for a new job, part-time workers who prefer full-time employment, and more. This alternative measure of unemployment, which conservatives often call the “real” unemployment rate, was 14.2 percent in January 2009 — 0.5 percentage points lower than it is today.
Simon Owens is an assistant managing editor at U.S. News & World Report. Follow him on Twitter, Facebook, or Google+. Email him at sowens@usnews.com
Monday, June 11, 2012 Wednesday, February 15, 2012
Plain and simple, it’s harder to be a “grown-up” in these economic times, and for the most part, the public agrees. Large majorities of Americans say it’s harder for younger adults to find a job, save for the future, pay for college, and buy a home, than it was for their parents’ generation. Young, Out of Work, and Optimistic - Recession Woes Haven’t Dampened Optimism Among Millennials
Thursday, December 8, 2011 Wednesday, November 9, 2011 Friday, March 4, 2011
February Jobs Report Shows Growth, But Nothing to Shout About: After months of disappointing reports, February meets expectations

After months of disappointing figures, February met expectations for employment gains, adding 192,000 jobs, the Labor Department reported. But while job seekers may see any upward trend as reason to celebrate, economists cautioned the job market still has a long way to go in this recovery.

"This feels good, but it’s really not getting at the problem yet," says Al Angrisani, former Assistant Secretary of Labor, who now works with distressed companies. "We’re not creating enough jobs to really drive a long-term reduction in the unemployment rate."

February Jobs Report Shows Growth, But Nothing to Shout About: After months of disappointing reports, February meets expectations

After months of disappointing figures, February met expectations for employment gains, adding 192,000 jobs, the Labor Department reported. But while job seekers may see any upward trend as reason to celebrate, economists cautioned the job market still has a long way to go in this recovery.

"This feels good, but it’s really not getting at the problem yet," says Al Angrisani, former Assistant Secretary of Labor, who now works with distressed companies. "We’re not creating enough jobs to really drive a long-term reduction in the unemployment rate."

Friday, January 21, 2011